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2006 Writers-in-Residence Print E-mail

Tasmania is the Island of Residencies!

In 2005 the Tasmanian Writers' Centre received many high quality applications from Australian and international writers for our 2006 Island of Residencies program.

Residencies in Tasmania in 2006, have been offered to Australian writers: Mitchell Joe (from the ACT), Emily Maguire (from NSW), Alice Addison (from NSW), Mark Mordue (from NSW),  Paddy O'Reilly (from Vic), Kim Mahood (from NSW); and international writers: Ken McGoogan and Jacqueline Turner (both from Canada), Laurence Fearnley (from NZ), and Mariko Nagai (from Japan).

Their biodata are below.

The TWC wishes to thanks all those writers who applied to the Island of Residencies program. We understand and appreciate the time and energy it takes to apply for such things. The TWC will be offering residencies in Tasmania again in 2007.

The 2006 Island of Residencies program is presented by the Tasmanian Writers' Centre, with the support of Arts Tasmania, the City of Hobart, the Australia Council, the Commonwealth Government peak arts funding and advisory body, the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs, and Burnie City Council.



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MITCHELL JOE won Australia’s first national poetry slam, ABC Radio National’s “The Deep End National Poetry Slam”, in November 2004. He represented Australia at the 2005 Poetry World Slampionships in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, where he finished in 5th place, smiling. In December 2005, he released his first poetry CD, “MAY CONTAIN TRACES OF NUTS”. You can read, hear, and watch his poems on his website, www.mitchelljoe.com. He currently lives in Canberra, where he is a Ph.D. student in the Philosophy Program of the Research School for Social Sciences at the Australian National University. (But what he really wants you to know is that once he saw a rainbow in the middle of a moonlit night.).

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KEN MCGOOGAN is a globe-trotting ex-journalist who survived shipwreck in the Indian Ocean, chased the ghost of Jane Lady Franklin from England to Tasmania, and placed a commemorative plaque on Boothia Peninsula in the High Arctic. His eight books include three on exploration. The recently published Lady Franklin's Revenge, hailed in Canada as "an unforgettable book," highlights Tasmania in 120 of its 420 pages. Ancient Mariner was reviewed as "the definitive biography" of eighteenth-century explorer Samuel Hearne. And the bestseller Fatal Passage: The Untold Story of John Rae, won four awards, among them the Writers' Trust of Canada Award for Biography, the Canadian Authors' Association History Award, and an American Christopher Award for a work of artistic excellence that "affirms the highest values of the human spirit." Ken has taught French in Dar es Salaam and Narrative Nonfiction in Toronto, and recently conducted workshops in eight Canadian cities on Writing as a Profession.

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MARIKO NAGAI was born in Tokyo but has lived in Europe and America most of her life, earning a Master of Arts degree in Creative Writing with poetry concentration from New York University, where she was the Erich Maria Remarque Poetry Fellow. Her translation, poetry, and fiction have appeared in American literary journals such as Asian Pacific American Journal, the Gettysburg Review, New Letters, Prairie Schooner, Southern Review and other journals, and have received the Pushcart Prize both in poetry (1998) and fiction (2001).

Mariko has received numerous awards and fellowships for her writing from art foundations and writers' conferences such as Breadloaf Writers Conference, Art Omi/Ledig House, La Napoule Art Foundation, to name few. My writing has been praised as possessing "the linguistic gifts to become a true poet" (Philip Levine) and "gifted with unusual insight and exciting and graceful language... one feels in her a deep commitment to poetic tradition" (Galway Kinnell). Trained as a poet, she also writes fiction - both for adults as well as children. She is the Director of the Writing Programs at Temple University Japan, where she teach Japanese literature and Creative Writing, and where she has received the Teacher of the Year Award twice (2004, 2005).

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EMILY MAGUIRE was born in Canberra in 1976, but grew up in the western suburbs of Sydney. A high-school drop-out, Emily spent her teens and early twenties working in a series of retail outlets and call centres for just long enough to fund her next overseas expedition. Emily eventually managed to stay at home long enough to complete her education, receiving a Master of Arts in English literature in 2005, and to write two novels.
Emily’s first novel, Taming the Beast, a darkly sexual coming-of-age story described by The Age as ‘thought-provoking and searing,’ has been translated into ten languages. Her second novel, The Gospel According to Luke, a contemporary love story set against a backdrop of religious terrorism and urban decay, will be published in August 2006.
Emily’s articles and essays on sex, religion, culture and literature have been published in newspapers and magazines including The Observer, The Sydney Morning Herald and Good Reading. Emily now lives in Sydney’s inner west where she divides her time between teaching English and writing.

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JURA LAURENCE FEARNLEY was born in New Zealand in 1963 and spent the first few years of  her life in the mid Canterbury rural town of Fairlie before moving to Christchurch.  She studied at the University of Canterbury, obtaining a BA in Art History and American Studies and a MA in American Studies , before moving to Wellington where she worked for several years as the  Curator at the Dowse Art Museum, Lower Hutt.  A period of overseas travel followed, more work in Art Museums (The Robert McDougall in Christchurch, The Dowse Art Museum in Lower Hutt, Te Papa Project Office , Wellington) interspersed with more travel: spending large amounts of time in France.  As a result she wrote her first novel, The Sound of her Body (Hazard Press, 1998) . In 1997 she was admitted to the M.A in Creative Writing Course at Victoria University in Wellington.  Shortly after this, she married and moved with her husband to Würzburg, Germany where she lived for four years, writing Room (Victoria University Press, 2000?) and Delphine's Run (Penguin, 2003). Room was short listed for the Montana New Zealand Book Awards 2001.  Returning to New Zealand in 2002 she completed Butler's Ringlet (Penguin 2004).
In the summer of 2004 she was awarded the New Zealand Antarctic Arts Fellowship and travelled to the Antarctic in January 2004.  As a result of this residency she completed her fifth novel, Degrees of Separation, which will be published by Penguin in April 2006.  She returned to the Antarctic in December 2005 and plans to write a series of short stories and poetry.
She has had short stories published in Sport, Radio New Zealand and various anthologies including, The Wide White Page: Writers imagine Antarctica (ed. Bill Manhire), The Picnic Virgin (ed. Emily Perkins) and Great Sporting Moments (ed. Damien Wilkins).  Laurence lives in Dunedin with her husband and four year old son.

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MARK MORDUE is a writer, journalist and editor. Born in 1960 and raised in Newcastle, NSW he spent a large portion of his teenage years growing up in Nhulunbuy on the Gove Peninsula of Arnhem Land. He would later reconnect to this experience in his late 20s and 30s touring the Northern Territory repeatedly with Aboriginal rock ‘n’ roll bands and Melbourne landscape painters.
These "Westie" and outback influences were to combine with his immersion in the Sydney post-punk music scene - where he made an impact as one of the leading rock journalists of the day - to affect a writing style that is often categorized as ‘New Journalism’.
Locally Mark’s work has appeared in The Australian, Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, The Bulletin, Rolling Stone, Vogue, Elle, GQ, HQ and The Big Issue, as well as the literary journals HEAT, Meanjin, Eureka Street and Overland.
Mark’s stories have gone on to be published internationally in The Nation, Planet, Salon, Interview, Madison and Speak in the USA, The Wire, Melody Maker and Sight + Sound in the UK and Purple in France.
He was awarded a 1992 Human Rights Media Award for his journalism and was the 2001 Asialink writer-in-residence at Beijing University. Mark was also the founding editor of the arts, fashion and pop culture magazine Australian Style (1992-97).
Allen & Unwin published his first book Dastgah: Diary of a Headtrip in late 2001. It is a loosely woven collection of travel pieces that incorporates elements of New Journalism, impressionistic glimpses, poetry, portrait pieces, even a dream, to paint the larger picture of a love story and a journey across the planet.  Upon release, Dastgah spent four weeks in the Sydney Morning Herald Non-Fiction Best Seller List and was short-listed for the 2002 Qantas/City of Brisbane Asia-Pacific Travel Writing Award. Film director Wim Wenders acclaimed it as the first book of its kind to take the road genre "into the 21st Century.
Mark currently teaches Creative Non-Fiction and Narrative Writing at the University of Technology, Sydney. He continues to freelance internationally and has been invited to guest edit a one-off edition of Meanjin for 2006. He is also developing a novel. Dastgah is was recently published by Hawthorne Books in the USA.

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Originally from Brisbane, ALICE ADDISON followed up a Bachelor of Arts at the University of Queensland with a Bachelor of Screen Production from the Queensland College of Art. She moved to Sydney in 1999 to attend the Australian Film Television and Radio School, and graduated in 2000 with a Master of Arts in Scriptwriting.   Since then, she has worked as assistant to a producer, an assistant script editor, and a freelance script assessor. These days, she spends most of her time writing.
In 2005 Alice co-wrote The Silence, a two-part mini-series produced by Jan Chapman for ABC-TV. Alice’s other writing credits include the Channel 10 series The Cooks, as well as two episodes of the six-part Chapman Pictures mini-series RAN (Remote Area Nurse), made for SBS and shot entirely on location on Masig Island in the Torres Straits in 2004.  While at AFTRS, she wrote short-films Bias, Grace and Left Lane Ends.
Alice is currently working on a number of feature projects, and in 2006 will be writer in residence, as part of the Tasmanian Writers' Centre’s Island of Residencies program to work on a filmscript adaptation of Julia Leigh’s novel The Hunter

JACQUELINE TURNER is in Launceston as poet-in-residence with the Tasmanian Writers Centre, and to participate in the Tasmanain Poetry Festival. She teaches creative writing at the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design and critical writing at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada. She will be teaching an online creative writing course for students in Canada during her residency. She has published three books of poetry: Into the Fold (ECW Press, 2000), Careful (ECW Press, 2003), and Seven into Even, which will be launched at the Tasmanian Poetry Festival. She co-edits a literary webzine called “The News,” writes poetry reviews for The Georgia Straight, and is involved with the gallery Artspeak, whose mandate is to build connections between writers and artists. In 2005, she was the State Government of Queensland’s inaugural poet-in-residence at the Judith Wright Centre of Contemporary Arts in Brisbane.

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PADDY O'REILLY is a fiction and screenplay writer. She has won a number of major national short story prizes and her work has been published widely in literary magazines as well as anthologised. Her novel, The Factory, published in October 2005, was listed as one of the best books of 2005 in ABR. She has written scripts for films which have been nominated for AFI awards and screened nationally and internationally. Paddy has been Asialink writer-in-residence in Japan, a fellow at Varuna the Writers' House, and a full fellow at the Vermont Studio Center, USA.
 
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KIM MAHOOD is the author of Craft for a Dry Lake, which was short-listed for a number of non-fiction awards, winning the 2000 Age Book of the year, the 2001 NSW Premier¹s Award and the 2001 Dobbie award. She is also a practising artist with work held in state, territory and regional collections. Kim has published work in Meanjin, Eureka St, Island, Best Australian Essays and Best Australian Stories, and has written for the Melbourne Age, the Bulletin, Art Monthly, Artlink and the Australian Book Review. She has been a resident at the Tyrone Guthrie Centre in Ireland, at Varuna in the Blue Mountains, and in 2005 participated in the Djerassi Resident Artist¹s program in California. In 2004 she received an Australia Council Literature Grant, and is currently working on a novel. She lives near Braidwood in NSW, teaching part time at the Institute of Art at ANU, and spends several months each year in the Tanami and Great Sandy Desert region, working in association with Aboriginal communities and cattle stations.



The 2006 Island of Residencies program is presented by the Tasmanian Writers' Centre, with the support of Arts Tasmania, the City of Hobart, the Australia Council, the Commonwealth Government peak arts funding and advisory body, the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs, and Burnie City Council.


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